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How to Choose the Best Grill For Your Backyard

It is that time of year, you mowed your lawn for the first time since October, you have dusted off the patio furniture, and it is time to throw your first barbecue of the season. This is all great except you need a new grill. This summer, you don’t want to be a casual griller, a weekend griller, or a never-griller. This year, you are committing to being the neighborhood griller. This means you are going to need the ultimate backyard barbecue grill.

How to choose the Grill For Your Backyard

The first step is determining which type of fuel you are wanting to use. Once you have chosen your fuel, you get to look at all the amazing options available. For a variety of options, Watson’s BBQ grills have everything you might need. The grill choices you make will determine what type of food you can grill, how much, and how long. Here are some great options for getting started on the process of choosing the perfect grill. 

Charcoal

Charcoal grills use lumps of charcoal or briquettes to heat the grill. The charcoal is what gives the food a smoky flavor, a classic to barbecue foods. The grill will require more prep work, as it takes a bit longer for the charcoal to light and heat up. Charcoal grills also require more attention with regulating the heat during the cooking process. When choosing a charcoal grill, you are choosing more work than other types of grills, but the tradeoff is that classic smoky barbecue flavor. 

Charcoal grills are for the iconic, classic, true-blood griller. The effort put into a charcoal grill is part of the fun of grilling on a charcoal grill. It makes the process of grilling a science and artform. When looking for a charcoal grill you have a few main designs. 

 

  • Kettle: This is the classic charcoal grill look. It is the best option for longer-cooking meats, like chicken and roasts. 
  • Barrel: Barrels are built like a barrel on its side. They are shallow but long, so they require a lot of briquettes to heat. They are perfect for cooking a lot of quick items, like burgers and hot dogs. Because the briquettes burn out quicker, they are not ideal for items that require a longer cook. 
  • Ceramic: These hold in the heat better so they offer more control over the cooking options. They are pricey, heavy, and require a lot of briquettes. The cooking surface is smaller, so won’t work well with a bigger gathering, but the longer heat allows for more cooking options, like briskets and turkey. 

In the debate of gas versus charcoal, charcoal tends to come out the winner. But like most things, it’s all about preferences. This article discusses why charcoal wins out in the end.

Grill For Your Backyard

Gas

Gas grills come with two options, hooking up the fuel from a propane tank, or from your home’s natural gas line. Natural gas burns cleaner and cheaper, but propane is more portable. Most gas grills can accommodate both options, so you don’t have to choose when you buy. Gas grills work best for getting a good sear, or cooking steady low heat. But if you are looking to cook anything for a long period of time, gas grills aren’t the best options. 

Gas grills are easy to use, and get to temperature quickly and efficiently. They also regulate the temperature better than other grills, creating a more even cooking surface. Gas grills are a great option if your grilling skills aren’t the best, but you are ready to start trying some new culinary masterpieces. Grills come in a variety of options. 

  • Tabletop: Tabletop options are great for camping or tailgating. You can put it on a table or on the tailgate to cook up a few burgers or hot dogs. They don’t have a big surface, so it works best for only a few people. 
  • Portable Carts: These are the most common options found in backyards. They are built on carts with wheels that allow you to move it in and out of spaces. You can find them with anywhere from two to six burners. 
  • Fixed Grill: This is a great option if you plan on creating a permanent grilling station. They are not movable, but they do offer a bit more cooking space. 

Pellet

Pellet grills burn small wood pellets and a small computer that can heat the grill up to a desired temperature. Having more control over the temperature makes it easier to cook items, especially longer-cooking items. The downside to the way these grills work, there is no direct heat, so searing won’t happen on your pellet grill. Think of these as outdoor ovens. While the wood pellets do smoke the meat, it won’t be as flavorful as a smoker or charcoal grill. 

When it comes to grilling, it is a science. If you are ready to become a backyard scientist, check this link out to get all the best scientific tricks.

Written by Mark Greene

Mark Greene is writer and life coach dedicated to helping men to perform at peak level. He shares dating advice, style tips and strategies for building wealth and success.